Aloe barbadensis

Aloe barbadensis Mill. (Liliaceae)

(2n = 14)








Syn : Aloe indica Royle, A. littoralis Koening., A. vera Tourn. ex Linn.

English names: Barbados aloe, Curacas aloe, Indian aloe, Jafarabad aloe.

Sanskrit name: Ghritakumari.

Vernacular names: Asm : Chalkunwari; Ben: Ghritakumari; Guj : Kumarpathu, Kunvar; Hin : Ghee kunvar; Kan : Lolesara; Kon : Kantikkor, Katkunvor; Mal: Kattarvazha kumari; Mar: Korphad; Ori : Gheokunri; Pun: Ghikur, Kawargandal; Tam: Alagai, Chirukuttali, Kuttilai; Tel: Chinnakata banda, Kala banda, Kittanara.

Trade names: Ghritakumari, Ghee kunvar.

Traditional use: TRIBAL: Leaf-pulp: in liver troubles, jaundice, fever, gonorrhoea, spleen disorder, rheumatism, piles, dysmenorrhoea, sterility in women; Leaf-mucilage: mild laxative, to cure hardening of breast tissues, in insect stings.

AYURVEDA: alternative, bitter, cooling, purgative, sweet, tonic, anthelmintic, useful in eye diseases, tumours, enlargement of spleen, liver troubles, vomiting, skin diseases, bilious­ness, asthma, leprosy, jaundice, strangury, ulcer; Flowers: anthelmintic.

UNANI: Gheekawar is useful in inflammation of spleen, lumbago, muscular pain, ophthal­mia, digestive, purgative; Leaves good for piles and biliousness.

Modern use: Aloe: in menstrual diseases, stomach pain, tonic after pregnancy, uterine disorders, high fever; Pulp: menstrual suppressions, nervous imbalance; Aloe com­pound: in treatment of women sterility; Mucilage: painful inflammation; Root: colic pain; Aloe mixture with other plant extracts: for treating obstruction of lymphatic system.

Phytography : A coarse-looking plant with a short (30-60 cm high) stem; leaves succulent, green, large (37 cm long, 10 cm broad, 2 cm thick), densely crowded; flowers in racemes, bright yellow, tubular, stamens frequently projected beyond the perianth tube.

Phenology: Flowering: September-December; Fruiting: scarce.

Distribution: A native of North Africa, Canary Islands and Spain; naturalised in India; many varieties are found in a semi-wild state in all parts of India; also cultivated in pots and gardens.

Ecology and cultivation: Xerophyte; propagated by suckers.

Chemical contents: Plant: aloin, aloe-emodin and resins.

Adulterant: Aloe candelabrum Berger is used as substitute for Aloe barbadensis Miller.



Syn : Aloe indica Royle, A. littoralis Koening., A. vera Tourn. ex Linn.

English names: Barbados aloe, Curacas aloe, Indian aloe, Jafarabad aloe.

Sanskrit name: Ghritakumari.

Vernacular names: Asm : Chalkunwari; Ben: Ghritakumari; Guj : Kumarpathu, Kunvar; Hin : Ghee kunvar; Kan : Lolesara; Kon : Kantikkor, Katkunvor; Mal: Kattarvazha kumari; Mar: Korphad; Ori : Gheokunri; Pun: Ghikur, Kawargandal; Tam: Alagai, Chirukuttali, Kuttilai; Tel: Chinnakata banda, Kala banda, Kittanara.

Trade names: Ghritakumari, Ghee kunvar.

Traditional use: TRIBAL: Leaf-pulp: in liver troubles, jaundice, fever, gonorrhoea, spleen disorder, rheumatism, piles, dysmenorrhoea, sterility in women; Leaf-mucilage: mild laxative, to cure hardening of breast tissues, in insect stings.

AYURVEDA: alternative, bitter, cooling, purgative, sweet, tonic, anthelmintic, useful in eye diseases, tumours, enlargement of spleen, liver troubles, vomiting, skin diseases, bilious­ness, asthma, leprosy, jaundice, strangury, ulcer; Flowers: anthelmintic.

UNANI: Gheekawar is useful in inflammation of spleen, lumbago, muscular pain, ophthal­mia, digestive, purgative; Leaves good for piles and biliousness.

Modern use: Aloe: in menstrual diseases, stomach pain, tonic after pregnancy, uterine disorders, high fever; Pulp: menstrual suppressions, nervous imbalance; Aloe com­pound: in treatment of women sterility; Mucilage: painful inflammation; Root: colic pain; Aloe mixture with other plant extracts: for treating obstruction of lymphatic system.

Phytography : A coarse-looking plant with a short (30-60 cm high) stem; leaves succulent, green, large (37 cm long, 10 cm broad, 2 cm thick), densely crowded; flowers in racemes, bright yellow, tubular, stamens frequently projected beyond the perianth tube.

Phenology: Flowering: September-December; Fruiting: scarce.

Distribution: A native of North Africa, Canary Islands and Spain; naturalised in India; many varieties are found in a semi-wild state in all parts of India; also cultivated in pots and gardens.

Ecology and cultivation: Xerophyte; propagated by suckers.

Chemical contents: Plant: aloin, aloe-emodin and resins.

Adulterant: Aloe candelabrum Berger is used as substitute for Aloe barbadensis Miller.

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